Informal Garages Rule Kenya

There has been a steady rise in the number of informal motor vehicle garages and repair shops over the last few years. It is no wonder that the sector currently accounts for the highest number of persons engaged in the licenced MSMEs by economic activity and establishment size. According to the Micro, Small and Medium Enterprises 2016 Survey released by the Kenya National Bureau of Statistics, those engaged in the repair of motor vehicles and motorcycles formed the majority of persons engaged in MSMEs. This demographic group represented 36.3% of the total number of small businesses in the country.

Image result for informal motor vehicle garages kenya

(source:http://www.openair.org.za/wp-content/uploads/2017/01/Truck-repairers-at-Suame-Magazine.jpg)

There are two main categories in the motor vehicle repair industry. The first one constitutes of new vehicle dealers. These offer after sales services inclusive of repairs. They are however limited to a warranty that is based on a set mileage. The second category is that of independent garages and workshops. These mainly handle a majority of the second hand imported vehicles as well as some new vehicles whose warranty with the new vehicle dealers has expired. It is in the latter category where these MSMEs are located.

It is with this in mind that the importance of ensuring professional standards in this sector are adhered to. A large number of these mechanics learn their trade through apprenticeship. This was what I found out during an interview I conducted with Barak Okoth, the Secretary of the Kisumu County MSE Association. He informed me that a majority of the artisans involved in the motor vehicle repairs industry were primary school dropouts who require to up skill their technical knowledge. Most of them can visually identify spare parts but do not know the technical terms which identify them. This poses a risk to the quality of repair work and service they offer. Any minor mismatch to this end will affect the performance of motor vehicles that undergo repairs in such garages. He also noted that the equipment that they use is outdated.

The Ministry of Industrialisation tasked the Kenya Motor Repairers Association (KEMRA) and the Kenya Bureau of Standards (KEBS) to develop a code of practice for motor vehicle garages for repairs and services. In consultation with other stakeholders in the industry, the KNWA: 2460 was drafted and formulated. It is a standardisation code of practice for this industry that dictates that motor vehicle garages adhere to the delivery of quality service during repairs of motor vehicles. One of the aims of developing this code of practice was to reduce accidents caused by faulty repairs. During the launch of the code of practice, Benard Ngoe who is the chairman of KEMRA pointed out that only 20% of informal garages follow professional standards.

In order to minimise the carnage on Kenyan roads, it is of key importance that focus be put on developing training programs that target informal motor vehicle mechanics. Key areas of implementation should include upskilling to enable the use of modern tools and equipment that are more efficient in diagnosing and servicing motor vehicles. This will ensure that informal garages will improve the quality of services that they offer. It will also give informal garage operators an avenue to upscale their operations thus improving the livelihoods of those engaged in this critical sector of our economy.

litualex@gmail.com 

Informal Economy Analyst 

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