Value Chain Development in the Informal Sector

A value chain is defined as the full range of activities that are required to bring a product or service from conception, through the intermediary phases of production and eventual delivery to final consumers. Value chains can be local, national or global, linking rural producers with traders and consumers worldwide. Their role in determining the quality and cost of a product and service cannot be overlooked for it is through them that effective competitiveness can be achieved.

(Source: https://images.theconversation.com)

It is hence important to understand the role value chains play in the route to market trajectory of any service or product. Thus, a value chain analysis at both firm and sector level is key to developing strategies aimed at improving the competitiveness of a product or service. At the firm level, this sort of analysis would be important for formal businesses to understand how much informality is in their value chain, as this will help them pin point areas through which they can fine tune the process in a bid to achieve quality standards in a cost-effective manner. At a sectoral level, it would provide information as to where informality sits in each sector and thus give a better understanding of which sectors have the densest or least levels of informality in their value chains, with the view to increasing their overall efficiency and competitiveness.

Considering that sustained poverty coupled with subpar economic growth has continued to inhibit the growth in the demand of locally manufactured goods, relatively cheaper internationally manufactured goods continue to gain the local market share. In this sense, locally manufactured goods are limited in their competitiveness. For example, value addition strategies that target micro and small businesses would greatly improve the quality of locally produced goods. In its strategy on decent work in the informal economy, the International Labor Organization (ILO) proposes that one way of improving the sustainability of informal enterprises may be to link them in cooperatives where jointly owned input supply, credit and marketing services can be organised without compromising the autonomy of the individual entrepreneur.

In markets that are dominated by very powerful players, small producers tend to be highly disadvantaged by being arm twisted into accepting lower income for their produce. A good example is in the agricultural sector where small-scale farmers have little control of market dynamics, hence cannot reap the full financial benefits due to issues such as the lack of proper storage facilities, market information and access to inputs. This leads to post-harvest wastage and losses brought about by hurriedly selling their produce at lower prices than if they had stored it for sale when demand is higher. It is with such issues in mind that the ILO stresses the importance of the improvement of value chain competitiveness, as it is seen as a powerful approach for generating growth and reducing poverty in developing countries, where roughly 75 percent of the population live in rural areas.

In a quest to integrate micro and small-scale enterprises into formal value chains, understanding their level of involvement in these is key to formulating policies and implementing strategies that contribute to the overall efficiency and competitiveness of locally manufactured products. This sort of analysis will benefit all the players along the value chain.

litualex@gmail.com

Informal Economy Analyst

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The link between counterfeiting and the Informal Economy

Trade in counterfeit products is a thriving business in areas with large informal economies for consumers are presented with products at substantially lower price points than the original products. The issue of aspirational satisfaction is another major reason why a good number of clients in informal economies opt to purchase counterfeit and pirated products. Also, most of the customers of these products in informal economies are usually faced with substantial budgetary constraints. Interestingly, the hazards that are associated with such products rarely feature on the minds of these customers. While looking at the issue of counterfeiting and piracy, clients that purchase these products either do so knowing that the products are counterfeit or are oblivious to the fact that the products are fake.

(Source: https://www.rouse.com)

It is important to note that counterfeiting and piracy steals market share from legitimate businesses and undermine innovation, which usually negatively affects economic growth. Criminal networks and organised crime thrive via counterfeiting and piracy activities. It is not surprising that such groups target informal markets as a means to distribute their products, given that these offer them higher profit margins. Also, given the unregulated structure of such markets, they encounter a lower risk of detection. Another factor that makes these markets attractive is their large nature, which offers manufacturers of counterfeit products a huge market in which they can trade, given the intricate distribution networks that exist therein.

A report by the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) that delves into the economic impact of counterfeits and piracy raises some of the key concerns in terms of the effects that these products have and classifies these into different categories. I would like to concentrate on some of the socioeconomic effects, with a specific focus on criminal activities and employment.

In as far as criminal activities are concerned, the report makes the point that counterfeiting and piracy transfer economic rents to parties which are often engaged in a variety of illegal activities, including tax evasion and drug trafficking. It can be assumed that a portion of the rents is eventually used to sustain further criminal activity, in a corrupt and organised manner. While I tend to agree with this point of view, it is important to add that informal markets have for long been driven by a sense of micro entrepreneurship that has birthed innovative ideas and products due to the cut-throat environment under which they operate, with the view of trying to remain afloat. Seeing as most businesses in the sector operate in areas that are intricately intertwined with poverty, the quest to make a quick buck will push most of them to disregard intellectual property rights and opt to sell products that are in demand.

Counterfeiting and piracy affect employment by shifting jobs from rights holders to infringing parties, which is where a large part of the informal economy comes into play. The shift has implications for the welfare of employees as working conditions in the sectors where these activities occur are often far poorer than those prevailing in the recognised firms that usually offer their employees better terms of employment and adhere to health and safety standards. Although OECD raises a fair point in this sense, it is of vital to take into consideration the fact that unemployment is a scourge that is bedevilling developing nations. The shrinking availability of formal employment opportunities leaves even highly qualified graduates with little option but to venture into informal business that are a huge driver for pirated products due to their higher unit profitability.

While trying to unpack the issues that arise from counterfeiting and piracy, it is crucial to unpack these by looking at both sides of the equation. Understanding the drivers of counterfeiting from an informal sector perspective is key to finding viable solutions to this vice. For example, companies that manufacture cosmetic products can produce smaller package units that are targeted at informal markets. This would enable them to tap into the consumer demographic in such economies. This strategy has been successfully implemented by some multinational companies that manufacture household consumables. Seeing informal markets as part of the solution instead of the problem will immensely contribute to the strategy aimed at combating counterfeiting and piracy.

litualex@gmail.com

Informal Economy Analyst.

Integrating the Informal Sector into Government Policy

Given the most recent statistics on the Kenyan economy which indicate that the informal economy accounts for the lion’s share of job creation outside agriculture, it is important to gain a deeper understanding of the sector dynamics. As per the Economic Survey 2017 released by the Kenya National Bureau of Statistics, the economy created a total of 832.9 thousand new jobs. Of these, 85.6 thousand were in the formal sector while 747.3 thousand were in the informal sector. The share of new jobs created in the informal sector represents a 5.9 percent growth from 83 percent during the previous year, to 89.7 percent or 13.3 million people.

(Source: https://berlinlcalling.files.wordpress.com)

The sector has sub sectors that fall into three main sub categories, namely agriculture, services and manufacturing. In line with the government’s big four agenda, it is imperative to align and in cooperate the informal economy into this strategy in a way that enables businesses in the sector to reap the benefits of the economic empowerment program. The step taken to merging the Youth, Women and Uwezo Funds into the Biashara Fund is a plausible move in that, if properly managed it will enhance the coordination of activities aimed at supporting micro and small enterprises.

In as far as the manufacturing agenda is concerned, the jua kali sector which employs wood and metal work artisans, should be at the forefront of target initiatives. Efforts to ensure that issues such as standardisation of their products and access to wider markets should be addressed. Also, improving their working spaces and conditions will go a long way in making sure that they can attract more clientele to their premises, as well as minimise work related hazards. Implementing skills upgrading programs are one way to deal with the low levels of productivity in this sector. Further, both county and national government need to work through the various micro and small enterprise associations to sub contract them for projects by prioritising them in tendering processes.

The agriculture sector is not only important for the provision inputs in the form of raw materials for various industries, but is also the cornerstone that would ensure that the goal of achieving food security is achieved. For any meaningful progress to be attained, interventions for this sector should be channelled through existing cooperatives and Saccos to target the provision of farm inputs such as seeds and fertilizers, extension and training services, marketing, including processing, consumer services such as local shops, credit and sharing of farm machinery.

The importance of working through these bodies is that since most of them comprise membership of small scale farmers, the government will reach this crucial segment of the Kenyan populace in a way that enables them to improve their livelihoods. These cooperatives are a vital go between in that they increase the negotiating power with market intermediaries, improve post-harvest services, provide marketing logistics and information, facilitate investment in shared structures such as processing plants, bulk purchase of farm inputs and most importantly, facilitate micro-credit schemes. They are also an important link in growing the demand and supply value chain.

The emerging commonality in the approach that should be taken in addressing the engagement of the informal sector by the different levels of government is that of working through their associations. For effective implementation of the various programs to occur, pre-qualification processes would have to be carried out. These bodies ought to be readied by being taken through capacity building initiatives in the areas of financial skills such as book keeping practices, technical skills upgrading as well as sales and marketing skills. By propping them up in this manner, they will not only be better placed to qualify for and absorb the funds that are channelled in their direction, but also exponentially develop the individual business entities of their members.

litualex@gmail.com

Informal Economy Analyst

 

 

Jobless Growth in Africa

Despite the fact that East Africa remains the fastest-growing sub-region in Africa with an estimated growth of 5.6 percent in 2017, up from 4.9 percent in 2016, it still grapples with low job growth rates. The African Economic Outlook 2018 by the African Development Bank Group (AFDB) further notes that it is imperative for sustained economic growth to create jobs which positively impact poverty reduction and lead to more inclusive growth.

(Source: https://www.afdb.org)

According to the report, the combination of high economic growth and low job creation has given rise to the claim that Africa is experiencing jobless growth. The findings of the document point to the fact that in the last decade, faster-growing countries in Africa actually generated fewer jobs than countries that grew more slowly. The slow job growth has mainly affected two demographic groups; women and youth aged between 15 to 24 years. Estimates of African population data indicate that it had 226 million youth in 2015, a figure projected to increase 42 percent, to 321 million by 2030. Its labour force is also projected to rise from 620 million in 2013 to nearly 2 billion in 2063.

In an effort to sustainably reduce poverty, economies must create more productive jobs, which are better remunerated and better-quality jobs. For this to happen, AFDB recommends that countries engage in structural transformation, which is a process whereby capital and labour is shifted away from low-productivity sectors toward higher-productivity sectors.

Structural transformation has encountered slow implementation due to a couple of reasons. First, the agricultural sector remains the dominant source of jobs in Africa, accounting for about 51 percent of employment in these countries, most of it in subsistence agriculture. The document highlights that almost 84 percent of Africa’s poverty is a result of employment in agriculture and services sectors. Second, the shift to manufacturing has been focused toward a comparatively small sector, which has the third-lowest relative productivity level after agriculture and services. Also, the labour resources that left agriculture have shifted toward wholesale and retail trade, much of which is characterized by low-productive informal activities.

As per findings of the report, the informal sector remains a key source of employment in most African countries, accounting for approximately 70 percent of jobs in Sub Saharan Africa and 62 percent in North Africa, with 93 percent of all job growth in Africa in the 1990s being accredited to the informal sector. The last factor that has slowed down the implementation of structural transformation is the fact that the public sector has generally been the main source of higher-paying formal sector jobs in many African countries. Fiscal constraints and demographic change have combined to limit the future scope of the public sector as a driver of formal sector employment growth.

One key policy recommendation that was proposed on the way forward as a priority for African governments is to encourage and embrace a shift toward labour-absorbing growth paths. In this sense, they should put in place programs and policies aimed at modernizing the agricultural sector, which employs most of the population and is typically the main step toward industrialization. A second priority is to invest in human capital, particularly in the entrepreneurial skills of youth, in an effort to facilitate the transition to higher-productivity modern sectors.

In as far as reversing the fortunes of the manufacturing sector, it is proposed that emphasis should be placed on light manufacturing, which is typically considered key to job creation in Africa. Doing so requires developing export capacity, given the continents small domestic markets. The interrelated nature of agriculture and manufacturing is crucial to achieving job creation as both are labour intensive. In the highly heterogeneous service sector, the way forward is to develop modern services while improving the productivity of informal activities.

Seeing as informality is a key component of African labour markets in that it accounts for an estimated 50–80 percent of GDP, 60–80 percent of employment, and up to 90 percent of new jobs on a continent where more than 60 percent of the population performs low-paid informal jobs, policy makers should avoid burying their heads in the sand and recognize the diversity and importance of the sector as a profitable activity that may contribute to economic development and growth.

litualex@gmail.com

Informal Economy Analyst.

The Significance of Investing in the Young Population

The Kenya Economic Report 2015 whose theme is ‘Empowering Youth through Decent and Productive Employment’ released by the Kenya Institute for Public Policy Research and Analysis (KIPPRA) is timely as it provides an indepth look at youth empowerment with a major focus on employment. The youth account for about 6o% of the labour force in the country, which is estimated to be growing at a rate of 2.9% per annum. According to the report, Kenya’s median age is estimated at 19 years and the proportion of the population that is below 15 years is estimated at 43%. Further, 78% of the population is aged below 35 years.

(Source: http://www.theeastafrican.co.ke)

A big challenge facing most youth is the lack of decent and quality jobs; almost three out of every four youth are engaged in the informal economy, traditional agriculture and pastoralist activities. The share of employment in the informal sector in total employment, excluding traditional agriculture and pastoralist activities, increased from about 17.1% in 1983-1987 to 82.7% in 2013/14. This significant increase in the informalization of employment can be attributed to a shrink in formal employment opportunities over the years. As is the case in most parts of sub Saharan Africa, most entrepreneurs opt to venture into informal business as a last resort for it is often the only way they can earn a living.

With Kenya’s median population age being below 20 years of age, in order to arrest the rapidly growing rates of unemployment that have seen a spike in the growth of entrepreneurial informality, the report calls for the development and implementation of employment creation policies and strategies to that will engage this demographic group. Some of the suggestions include investment in productivity enhancement skills, and quality job creation in fast growing and labour-intensive sectors such as services, agriculture and industry, while promoting the manufacture of export goods for the regional and international markets.

Given that about 88 per cent of manufacturing sector employment is in the informal sector, potential interventions in the sector would be a good place to begin. As is the norm, jobs in the informal sector are characterized by low wages and a general lack of social security benefits. In this sense, the quality of jobs provided by the sector are of poor quality. Also, due to the reason that informality is driven by incentives to minimize tax and compliance costs as well as other external factors such as challenges to access of credit, the report suggests that in order to create quality jobs, policy making should mitigate some of the constraints limiting their transformation to formal enterprises.

It is interesting to note that the report also indicates that Kenyan micro, small and medium sized enterprises (MSMEs) in manufacturing represent over 60% of establishments and account for 29% of those employed in manufacturing. The breakdown of MSMEs involved in manufacturing according to the 2016 MSME Report by the Kenya National Bureau of Statistics (KNBS) is 95% as micro, 3.8% as small and 1.2% as medium sized enterprises. The sector was ranked as the highest contributor accounting for 24.3% of MSMEs gross value added. At publication of this report, this figure stood at 11.7% of gross value added. This represents a 12.6% increase over a two-year period. The significance of ingraining a value addition angle into the manufacturing processes of MSMEs cannot be overstated as it will ensure that manufacturers in this sector of the economy not only reap the benefits of fetching higher market prices for their products, but also enhance the growth of robust value chains that are essential to the successful implementation of national industrialization plans. As is the case with most informal enterprises, firms grapple with issues that include limited access to technology as well as limited research and development activity.

It is clear that tackling the challenges posed by informality is a key to providing a sustainable solution to youth unemployment in the country. Focusing on aspects that improve their productivity such as upskilling, increased access to technology as well as investing in research and development processes will enable those that are engaged in manufacturing to venture into value addition for their products. The trickle-down benefits of implementing policies that are centred around overcoming the aforementioned challenges will be an investment in this country’s future.

litualex@gmail.com

Informal Economy Analyst.

 

The Kenyan Government’s Priorities for the Informal Sector

It is a welcome development to see that the prolonged electioneering period has come to an end, for it was characterised by the slow down and even stagnation of certain businesses that has had a negative effect to the economy. As the new administration comes into office, it is interesting to note that it has prioritised aspects of the informal sector in its agenda. These are articulated in their campaign manifesto, some of which were prioritised by the president during his inauguration speech.

(Source: https://i0.wp.com/www.dhahabu.co.ke)

In their manifesto, the current administration aimed to create and fully implement a robust Small and Medium sized Enterprises (SME) development and support programme which would formalise the large number of informal businesses and support their growth from micro to small to medium sized enterprises, and eventually into large firms. By doing so, they aim at catalysing the creation of at least one million jobs and consequently contributing to tax revenues.

The two main demographic groups that characterise the informal sector are women and youth. Between 2013 and 2016, 12,000 Micro, Small and Medium sized Enterprises (MSMEs) have received training in entrepreneurship and management. The manifesto states that a total of Ksh25bn has been transferred to MSMEs through Youth, Uwezo and Women enterprise funds providing support to close to 15 million people who have been enabled to set up businesses. The plan to establish the Biashara Bank by merging the Micro and Small Enterprises Authority, the Youth Enterprises Development Fund, the Women Enterprises Fund and the Uwezo Fund as a means to coordinating the delivery of affordable financing and support for business development is a move that will enhance the focus on the lack of capital as an impediment to the establishment, growth and development of informal businesses. Notably, through the Women Enterprise Fund, women have demonstrated that they are a highly bankable and reliable borrower with a repayment rate of 92%.

Further, providing low interests loans to youth owned enterprises to enable them to grow their businesses has seen an increase from Ksh4.9bn accessed by 407,793 young people in 2006, to Ksh11.8bn disbursed to 893,438 young people in 2013 under the Youth Enterprise Development Fund. As alluded to above, coordinated efforts towards targeting the relevant demographic groups will fine tune the government’s focus. This should include policies and systems that track the growth and performance of businesses that receive funding with a view of informing the direction to be taken during capacity building initiatives.

The manifesto points out the fact that about 80% of the Kenyan population relies on agriculture for employment and livelihood, and that the sector contributes approximately 27% to GDP, about 40% of government revenue and more than 60% of the total export revenue for the country. The plan to establish the Food Acquisition Programme (FAP) that is aimed at creating market demand and stabilising prices for products from small-scale farmers. Under this programme, the government will buy 50% of it’s food requirements from small holder farmers. The fact that Kenya is a major agricultural exporter and that only 16% of all exported agricultural output is processed, the move by the President to target the creation of 1,000 Small and Medium sized Enterprises in agro-processing is a welcome move.

Efforts to construct the Kenya Leather Park in Machakos for over 7,000 SMEs, the setting up of the Leather Cluster Common Manufacturing Facility in Kariokor as well as increasing the number of Export Processing Zones (EPZs) during their previous term is a step in the right direction. However, to ensure sustained growth of these industries will require that Kenya fine tunes its approach towards agriculture as a base requirement for the setting up of light manufacturing. Key to this is setting up collection points for hides at abattoirs, making beef farmers and pastoralists aware of the right cows to breed for higher quality hides, increasing the productivity per acre for agricultural produce as well as setting up sufficient storage facilities that minimise post-harvest wastage.

litualex@gmail.com

Informal Economy Analyst.

 

 

Lessons from China’s Economic Policy

Over the years, China has managed to turn around its economy by instituting certain reforms which have seen the country’s economy grow exponentially during the last 60 years into a global economic powerhouse. Most of these were done by recalibrating how they interacted with the informal sector in their country. The reforms first took shape in the agriculture sector with the household responsibility system (HRS) replacing the people’s commune system. Under this system, individual households were instituted as the basic unit of farm operation, as opposed to a collective team of 20 to 30 households in the past. The HRS gave individual households autonomy over production and farmers were given incentives to increase output.

(Source: http://media.philstar.com/images/the-philippine-star/business )

A study carried out by the Lancaster University Management School indicates that Between 1978 and 1984, China’s average annual growth rate of agriculture was 7.7%, after the introduction of the household responsibility system. The significant improvement in agriculture helped the country to release labour from land to industry and service sectors. This labour reallocation process was necessary as China’s agriculture was characterised by an egalitarian system of distribution of cultivated land with more than 200 million rural households, each cultivating less than 0.55 hectares. With the improvement in productivity in the agricultural sector, there was no need for a large number of people to stay on land. Agricultural employment as a share of labour force fell from more than 70% in 1978 to 60% in 1990 and 35% in 2011. The release of such a large number of economically active population from land hugely helped China’s development of the labour-intensive, low-skilled manufacturing sector.

In addition to the introduction of the HRS, China successfully re-introduced marketization. In implementing agricultural reforms, China first tried a dual-track approach. Under this approach, farmers were required to deliver a portion of their output to the state and allowed to sell the rest of the output on the free-market. With the newly earned profits, farmers set up or pulled resources into town and village owned enterprises (TVEs). These are communal organizations managed by managers on a contractual basis.

Town and village owned enterprise operate outside of the Chinese government’s apparatus and were highly market-oriented. Even though they did not enjoy preferential government treatment, they were also not subject to widespread state regulation. The study further notes that between 1979 and 1991, TVEs grew at an average rate of 25.3% in comparison to that of state owned enterprises which grew at 8.4%. Though TVEs were not private firms, since they were often owned by local governments or local communes rather than solely by private owners, they cultivated an internal culture of competition in the Chinese economy which helped stimulate efficiency of the state‐owned enterprises. It is worthy to note that TVEs were the major export drivers of China’s impressive export growth. For example, in 1999, the value of TVE exports of US$94 billion accounted for 48% of China’s total exports. Much of these were labour‐intensive products involving simple production techniques.

Another aspect that accelerated China’s growth and economic success can be attributed to privatisation. The study notes that the ownership structure of private firms was not properly defined until 1988. Private firms only became an integral part of the Chinese economy in 1997 and had their legal status established in 1998. The rapid growth of the private sector began with the introduction of the policy whereby the government not only lowered entry barriers in most sectors, but also pursued a policy of “grasping the big, and letting go of the small”. This meant that State Owned Enterprises were to only be kept in “strategic sectors” whereas small and medium sized enterprises (SMEs) were either privatised or their ownership transferred from the central government to local governments.

Lastly, the study shows that China’s development in manufacturing has also benefited from inward foreign direct investment (FDI) whereby the early years of China’s history of inward FDI was particularly dominated by the Chinese diaspora. Chinese diaspora-invested firms cooperated with TVEs and other indigenous Chinese firms and introduced them to international markets as well as freed them from domestic market constraints. In this sense, the diaspora-invested firms also helped indigenous Chinese firms to exploit the country’s comparative advantage in cheap labour and to translate its comparative advantage into international competitiveness.

Kenya is a country whereby about 75% of the population rely on agriculture for employment and livelihood. Outside agriculture, a vast majority of its citizens are employed in the informal economy, accounting for 90% of the employment demographic. The route taken by China is one which the country can borrow a leaf from when looking towards ways in which it can transform and grow its economy through agriculture and manufacturing.

litualex@gmail.com

Informal Economy Analyst.