Capacity Building for Informal Business

Efforts directed towards capacity building of micro, small and medium enterprises are yet to be well structured in a manner that ensures their sustainable growth. With their contribution to new jobs in Kenya standing at 90% and accounting for 35% of the country’s GDP, there is a gap that needs to be filled which will enhance their productivity. Most businesses in the informal sector continue facing steep hurdles that undermine their performance.

(Source: http://www.corporate-digest.com/images/news/)

The European Commission’s Guide for Training in SMEs puts forward actions that will enhance the performance of businesses in the sector. Some of the interventions consist of factors that ensure the success of a business from which valuable lessons can be drawn. These include anticipation of skills, assessment, adoption of a collective approach, exploitation of opportunities as well as providing guidance and support.

The anticipation of skills and competence related to the needs of the market is crucial in order for a business to remain relevant and up to date in a rapidly changing economy. A good example is that of businesses having the skills necessary to work with new technologies that will increase their output and make them more productive. This factor enhances the longevity of a business in a way that it constantly adapts to the needs of clients.

In the area of assessment, it is important for businesses to constantly carry out a needs assessment. This will put them in a better position when it comes to assessing their requirements, and thus assist in the setting of objectives that facilitate the planning of their operations. More importantly, the evaluation and modification of the results regarding the chosen objectives is a crucial element of developing a permanent culture of assessment. This process enables them to become dynamic in the markets in which they operate.

A collective approach is important when engaging with the informal sector. Public institutions in the field of training, professional bodies as well as social partners such as development finance institutions need to be actively involved in the development and execution of strategies that are aimed at strengthening the sector. This collective investment will provide a solid foundation for building and qualitatively growing this sector of the economy.

The collaborative effort mentioned above should be governed by the principle of guidance and accompaniment. This approach points towards the mentoring of informal businesses in a way that helps them to overcome the obstacles that they face. This can be done by assisting them to put in place and strengthen internal organisational structures such as having detailed and updated financial records. Businesses in this sector of the economy can also learn a lot from each other by sharing practices that make them more productive.

Last but not least is that informal businesses need to be facilitated in a way that will enable them to maximise the opportunities within their field of operation. In the light of this, the right information such as local and regional market opportunities need to be availed to them. This has to be coupled with policies that facilitate their access to these opportunities. When correctly equipped and facilitated, informal businesses will grow due to these new economic and social opportunities.

 

litualex@gmail.com

Informal Economy Analyst

 

 

 

 

The Role of Informality in the Kenya Industrial Transformation Programme 

The Kenya Industrial Transformation Programme (KITP) is an effort by the government to create an industrial hub in the country through sector specific initiatives in agro processing, textiles and apparel, leather, fisheries, services and SMEs (small and medium enterprises). With the SMEs sector being the fastest growing business segment of the economy accounting for 83% of the total employment demographic, I will highlight some of the strategies that have been proposed to make it more productive.

Image result for Kenya industrial Transformation Plan

(Source:https://issuu.com/kamkenya/docs/kitp_short_version_20150910__1_)

Some of the challenges that the sector faces include a lack of understanding of basic business practices such as book keeping and marketing. These limit their growth when it comes to accessing finance to expand their operations for they are seen to be high risk clients by financial institutions. The recent interest rate cap has negatively affected them as fewer can access loans from banks. Their level of human capital is also low due to a lack of formal education amongst most of the workers engaged in the sector. Most SMEs also have little knowledge of other markets which puts them at a disadvantage when it comes to approaching the export market.

Proposed initiatives in KITP aimed at uplifting the sector include the setting up of a fund to provide low cost financing to SMEs. The fund is to be set up as a credit guarantee system or as an investment in private equity funds with contribution from both government and development finance institutions. It is targeted at those SMEs with promising business plans as well as those that demonstrate potential for growth. 

The strategy also plans on establishing communication and training between large companies and SMEs so as to facilitate subcontracting. This move is meant to increase the share of large corporations in the country sourcing from local SMEs to 30%, while building the capacity of SMEs to meet these needs. This will also look into ways of  improving the capacity of the large companies to identify and manage suitable SMEs.

Another intervention is that of enhancing MSE’s (Micro and Small Enterprises) competitiveness. This will be done through a competition in every county where 5 products from entrepreneurs engaged in the manufacturing and agribusiness sub sectors will be selected to have their products available on supermarket shelves. The process will involve conducting quality, packaging and branding training to get their products certified by the Kenya Bureau of Standards (KEBS). The winner of this competition will receive a prize of Kshs 1 million aimed at improving their operations.

Further, there are plans to establish a metal fabrication centre of excellence in Kariobangi, Nairobi, aimed at upgrading the existing Jua Kali metal fabricators by providing common user facilities, training programmes and incubation facilities. This will improve the quality and quantity of the products that these artisans produce, as well as equip them with technical skills which will include knowledge on how to operate modern machinery.

The KITP should not be one of those policy documents that are drafted, launched and eventually gather dust on the shelves of libraries and institutions. It is a noble initiative that needs to be fast tracked and implemented as it will translate to the improvement of the lives of the millions of Kenyans that are engaged in micro, small and medium sized economic activities.

litualex@gmail.com

Informal Economy Analyst

 

The importance of ICT in Informal Business

We live in an age where access to information is at its highest level. With the onslaught of digital technology, the internet has become a vital source of unlimited information. This has been hastened by the increased availability of smartphones, which have made it possible for people to get onto the internet from wherever they are through these mobile devices. This technological advancement has transformed the lives of many people by making it easier for people to access various services from the comfort of their palm.

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(Source: https://www.howwemadeitinafrica.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/10/Tala-600×300.jpeg  )

The effects of this advancement in technology has changed the way business is conducted by the introduction of new and innovative ways of reaching out to clientele. Micro-businesses have embraced the use of mobile payment technology in their operations. They view this mode of conducting business as an easier form of cash delivery to their suppliers and business partners and accessing loans as it is a system which is relatively affordable, personal and can be used anywhere and at any time. These factors have fast tracked its growth.

A study conducted by Internet World Stats indicates that Africa accounts for 16.6% of the global population and has an internet penetration rate of 26.9%. In comparison, the penetration rate in Latin America and the Caribbean is 59.4%, 56.5% in the Middle East, 76.7% in Europe and 88.1% in North America.  On the African continent, Nigeria leads with an internet penetration rate of 47.9%, which is 27.4% of the continent’s total internet usage. Kenya is ranked third with a penetration rate of 66%, contributing to 9.5% of internet usage. Population size was a major variable that was considered when conducting the study.

The penetration rate on the continent presents an opportunity that can be exploited as a means for businesses to reach a wider audience. The Kenya National Bureau of Statistics latest survey of Micro Small and Medium Enterprises indicates that 43.1% of MSMEs do not use Information and Communication Technology (ICT) because they don’t think that it is vital to their operations. 14.3% thought that it was too costly while 4.5% cited a lack of access to electricity as the reason. There is a need to educate MSMEs on the importance of ICT as a means to growing their businesses.

The survey also looked at the type of ICT equipment available in licensed businesses. 40.7% of the MSMEs had a mobile phone, 15.0% had a radio while 10.5% of the respondents reported not having any ICT gadget. Availability of the fax machine, tablet, digital / video cameras was reported by less than 5% of the respondents. This is a clear indication of the importance of mobile phones as a gateway to interacting with small businesses. A lot more can be done to facilitate business transactions in the informal economy considering that only 49.3% of the businesses surveyed use mobile money platforms. It is a platform that is yet to be fully exploited as it is often underrated as an avenue to develop business capacity.

litualex@gmail.com

Informal Economy Analyst